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Classic Rock

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Eric Clapton used voodoo to steal Pattie Boyd from his friend George Harrison

  
Eric was hopelessly infatuated and this music, with its lovelorn, wailing guitar and pleading lyrics had been composed in adoration – a shameless attempt to woo her.

The song was Layla, and its effect was overwhelming. Listening to it provoked awe that 'the most powerful, moving song I had ever heard' should have been written about her, Pattie now recalls, although she was concerned that it would be instantly decoded, not only by her husband, family and friends but by the tens of thousands of strangers who would buy the album it featured on.

But, she says: 'The song got the better of me. I could resist no longer.'

And so, step by step, Pattie surrendered, caught between the rival attentions of Eric and George in music's best-known love triangle.

How Eric Clapton used voodoo to steal George Harrison's girl

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In the autumn of 1970, Eric Clapton summoned a young woman called Pattie Boyd, one of the leading British models of her generation, to the South Kensington flat used by his band.
The Who

  last edited: Fri, 19 Oct 2018 21:20:50 -0400  
Daltrey had moved to Acton from Shepherd's Bush, a more working-class area. He had trouble fitting in at the school, and discovered gangs and rock and roll. He was expelled at 15 and found work on a building site. In 1959 he started the Detours, the band that was to evolve into the Who. The band played professional gigs, such as corporate and wedding functions, and Daltrey kept a close eye on the finances as well as the music.

Daltrey spotted Entwistle by chance on the street carrying a bass and recruited him into the Detours. In mid-1961, Entwistle suggested Townshend as a guitarist, Daltrey on lead guitar, Entwistle on bass, Harry Wilson on drums, and Colin Dawson on vocals. The band played instrumentals by the Shadows and the Ventures, and a variety of pop and trad jazz covers.Daltrey was considered the leader and, according to Townshend, "ran things the way he wanted them". Wilson was fired in mid-1962 and replaced by Doug Sandom, though he was older than the rest of the band, married, and a more proficient musician, having been playing semi-professionally for two years

Dawson left after frequently arguing with Daltrey and after being briefly replaced by Gabby Connolly, Daltrey moved to lead vocals. Townshend, with Entwistle's encouragement, became the sole guitarist. Through Townshend's mother, the group obtained a management contract with local promoter Robert Druce, who started booking the band as a support act. The Detours were influenced by the bands they supported, including Screaming Lord Sutch, Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers, Shane Fenton and the Fentones, and Johnny Kidd and the Pirates. The Detours were particularly interested in the Pirates as they also only had one guitarist, Mick Green, who inspired Townshend to combine rhythm and lead guitar in his style. Entwistle's bass became more of a lead instrument, playing melodies. In February 1964, the Detours became aware of the group Johnny Devlin and the Detours and changed their name.Townshend and his roommate Richard Barnes spent a night considering names, focusing on a theme of joke announcements, including "No One" and "the Group". Townshend preferred "the Hair", and Barnes liked "the Who" because it "had a pop punch".

Daltrey chose "the Who" the next morning.

In a May 1974 interview with Creem Magazine, Jimmy Page claimed to have played rhythm guitar on the first song Cant Explain as a session guitarist and this was confirmed by Pete Townshend and record producer Shel Talmy. According to those working on the recordings, however, Page's session contribution is believed to have not made the final cut, and has been brought into question.

Source Wikipedia.

The Who - I Can't Explain

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The Who - Live At The Fillmore East 1968 out now! Check it out: https://lnk.to/TheWhoFillmoreEast Explore more music from The Who: https://lnk.to/TheWhoBestO...


#thewho
#rock
 
"the hair " as a band name ...i wonder if they still would have done as well ...
  
"Hair" today , gone tomorrow eh! Haha
Bell Bottom Blues Eric Clapton

  
Derek And The Dominos - Bell Bottom Blues ( studio version)

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Bell bottom blues, you made me cry. I don't want to lose this feeling. And if I could choose a place to die It would be in your arms. Do you want to see me c...

Bell Bottoms are pants that are very tight in the top but flare out at the bottom. They were popular in the '60s.
Derek and the Dominos formed after Eric Clapton, Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon worked on George Harrison's solo album, All Things Must Pass. They went to England and played a bunch of small clubs all over Europe, with Clapton and Whitlock writing songs along the way. The band was in France when the inspiration for this song hit. Whitlock told us: "Eric met this girl, she was like a Persian princess or something, and she wore bell bottoms. She was all hung up on him - he gave her a slide that Duane (Allman) had given him and he wrapped it in leather and she wore it around her neck. She didn't speak a word of English and they had to date through an interpreter. That relationship did not last but a week. He started the song over there, then when we got back to England, we finished it up in his TV room in Hurtwood Edge."
This was released as the B-side of "Layla." The song "Layla" is about Clapton's love for Pattie Harrison, who at the time was married to George Harrison. The entire album is about unrequited love, but this song is not about Pattie.
This is the only studio album Derek and the Dominos recorded. They attempted another, but the sessions imploded over what Whitlock describes as "Ego Problems."
Bobby Whitlock didn't initially get a songwriting credit on this track, but that changed thanks to an act of kindness from Clapton. When we spoke with Bobby in 2015, he explained how the song came together and the saga of the songwriting credits. Said Whitlock: "Just before the 40th anniversary of Layla came out, Eric asked as they were packaging everything, 'What's Bobby going to get out of this?' And Michael [Eaton, Clapton's manager] told him, 'Nothing, because he sold all of his royalties. He sold all of his vested interest in it.' Well, unbeknownst to me, Eric and Michael took their attorneys in to the respective Warner/Chappel and Universal and all the other companies and bought back my rights to my income and restored them and gave them back to me. Out of the blue.

So all of my royalties have come back. And now it's even more so, because it hasn't been a month-and-a-half ago that I wrote him to explain how 'Bell Bottom Blues' came about, and I sent it to Eric and to Michael. Someone had come online and says something about, 'Is this true that 'Bell Bottom Blues' was written about a pair of trousers?'

And I said, Yeah, well, it was that and this girl in France that Eric was seeing for a little while while we were there. I'd forgotten about Pattie [Boyd - subject of 'Layla'] asking him about those pants. But anyway, before I would answer this and put it out publicly online, I decided, Well, I probably ought to write Eric.

I had his e-mail address, but I'd never written him. I never asked for anything. You know, I don't want anything from anybody, especially him. I wrote to him and said, 'I just want to clear this up, in case you've forgotten, this is how it came.' I said, 'You came to me at Hurtwood [Clapton's house in England where the band would rehearse], I was standing in the doorway of the TV room and you walked up to me and you said, 'What do you think of this?''

He was holding the guitar and he sang me the first two verses, all except for the last line on the second verse. And I said, 'You won't find a better loser.'

And then we went into the TV room and wrote the chorus, the bridge: 'Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you? Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back? I'd gladly do it.' And then Eric comes in: 'I don't want to fade away, give me one more day.' And then the last verse, he wrote three quarters of it, and I came in with the very last line. I said, 'That's how it goes. I hope this helps refresh your memory.' And that was the end of it.

Well, within three minutes he wrote back, 'He's right, he's absolutely right.' He was writing to Michael, saying, 'Yeah, I've been thinking about this.'

Well, they have gone to all of the PR reps, ASCAP, BMI, all of the people, Universal, all the folks that changed it around. So from now on forever, 'Bell Bottom Blues' is going to read 'Written by Eric Clapton and Bobby Whitlock.'"
The entire album was recorded in 10 days. They recorded this early in the sessions, a week before "Layla." There were some very talented people in the studio that made it work. Says Whitlock, "When you let a horse run a race, it will run its finest race on its own. When you get some musicians and you get some creative people, you give them the opportunity to do what they're supposed to do, and they'll do just that. Given the right circumstances, they'll perform at their peak. They'll draw from the source. These songs don't come out of your head. They're not something you sit down and figure out. They're things that flow through you - we were just instruments, just like the instruments in our laps. We were provided an opportunity to lock ourselves away and let the creative principle of the universe flow through us."
Clapton recorded most of this while lying on the floor and strung out on drugs. The band did a lot of drugs at this time, but Clapton feels it did not hurt the recording process.
Frandsen De Schonberg is the French artist who painted the picture used for the album cover. The band was staying with his son, Emile, when Clapton met the bell bottom princess.
Hal David wrote a different song with the same title in the '50s. He would later team up with Burt Bacharach and write many famous songs, including "Walk On By" and "Do You Know The Way To San Jose?"
Clapton performed an acoustic version of this on his 2001 Reptile tour.
Along with his wife Coco Carmel, Bobby Whitlock recorded a new version of this for their album Other Assorted Love Songs. For more on Derek and the Dominos, check out our Bobby Whitlock interview.

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/derek-the-dominos/bell-bottom-blues
 
Great tune for me i wouldnt say all his stuff is good ,lay down sally ,swing low sweet chariot ,for example , but all a personal prefence  really ,but Bell bottom is a good un
  
Yeah that period where he knocked out those quasi reggae tunes like I shot the sheriff and made a total balls up of after midnight and those you mention were not good. Not a consistent dude, but laced with brilliance
David Bowie Cat People

  
See these tears so blue An ageless heart that can never mend Tears can never ...

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See these tears so blue An ageless heart that can never mend Tears can never dry A judgment made can never bend  See these eyes so green I can stare for... - Mark Thomas - Google+


See these tears so blue
An ageless heart that can never mend
Tears can never dry
A judgment made can never bend

See these eyes so green
I can stare for a thousand years
Just be still with me
You wouldn't believe what I've been through
Well you've been so long
And I've been putting out the fire....

With gasoline!
Janis Joplin- Another Little piece of my heart

  
How are y'all out there?  Y'ok? You staying stoned and you got enough water a...

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How are y'all out there?  Y'ok? You staying stoned and you got enough water and you got a place to sleep and everything? Music's for grooving man and it... - Mark Thomas - Google+


How are y'all out there? Y'ok? You staying stoned and you got enough water and you got a place to sleep and everything? Music's for grooving man and it's not for putting yourself through bad changes.

Here's the totally lovely Janis with the Woodstock version of Take A Little Piece of My Heart.

#janis
#janisjoplin
#woodstock
Ten Years After- Im Going Home

  
From a guitarist's perspective Woodstock has several highlights.  There's Jim...

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From a guitarist's perspective Woodstock has several highlights.  There's Jimi Hendrix's immortal take on "The Star-Spangled Banner," a mesmerizing perf... - Mark Thomas - Google+


From a guitarist's perspective Woodstock has several highlights.

There's Jimi Hendrix's immortal take on "The Star-Spangled Banner," a mesmerizing performance by newcomers Santana, Richie Havens' thumb-fretting madness and Pete Townshend's Gibson SG acrobatics with the Who.

But for a full-on blues-rocking experience, there's no beating Ten Years After's adrenaline-fueled reading of "I'm Going Home." The performance, an intense nod to vintage blues and Fifties rock and roll, featured the lightning-fast fretwork of Ten Years After frontman Alvin Lee.

"The solo on the movie sounds pretty rough to me these days," Lee told Guitarworld not long before his death in 2013. "But it had the energy, and that was what Ten Years After were all about at the time."

The performance made instant stars out of the British band, which led to more big-name festivals, a label change and their biggest hit, 1971's "I'd Love to Change the World."

During Guitarworld's interview—which was tied into his new studio album at the time—the interviewer couldn't help but steer things toward "I'm Going Home":

"The first time I saw the Woodstock film, I was completely knocked out by Ten Years After's performance of "I'm Going Home." It is, without a doubt, one of the movie's true guitar highlights. I remember thinking I'd never seen a blues/rock guitarist play that fast before, at least not a guitarist in 1969. Where the hell did that come from?

You’re obviously a man of very good taste! Seriously, though, I never really tried to play fast. It kind of developed from the adrenalin rush of the hundreds of gigs I did long before Woodstock. They called me "Captain Speedfingers" and such, but I didn't take it seriously. There were many guitarists faster than me—Django Reinhardt, Barney Kessel, John McLaughlin and Joe Pass to name a few.

The solo in the movie sounds pretty rough to me these days, but it had the energy, and that was what Ten Years After were all about at the time. However, I often wonder what would have happened if they had used “I Can't Keep From Crying, Sometimes” in the movie instead of "I’m Going Home."

Did you admire the other great fast bluesman of the time, Johnny Winter?

Strangely enough, I wasn't into fast guitarists. I preferred Peter Green’s subtle touch. I saw him with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers at the Marquee Club in London and was very impressed. He was the only guitarist I've ever seen to turn the volume control on his guitar down during a solo.

What kind of delay/reverb, amp and overdrive did you use on the solo on "I'd Love to Change the World"?

As far as I remember, it was a Wem Dominator used as a pre-amp into the old Marshalls. I had the Wem 15-Watt power amp padded down to guitar input level. The echo was an EMT plate"

source https://www.guitarworld.com/artists/revisiting-alvin-lee-woodstock-magic-ten-years-afters-im-going-home

#Tenyearsafter
#alvinlee
#Woodstock
Pink Floyd Echoes

  
Echoes was originally called "Return To The Sun Of Nothing.". This is an acou...

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Echoes was originally called "Return To The Sun Of Nothing.". This is an acoustic semi rehearsal version played at Abbey Road Studios.  The band got the... - Mark Thomas - Google+


Echoes was originally called "Return To The Sun Of Nothing.". This is an acoustic semi rehearsal version played at Abbey Road Studios.

The band got the idea for this when Rick Wright played a single note on his keyboard, and Roger Waters got the idea to record it into a microphone attached to a Leslie speaker, which created a swirling effect.

At this stage of their career, Pink Floyd wrote most of their songs separately. This was the first one in a while that they wrote together.

If you noticed something eerily familiar while watching Phantom of the Opera, you may have picked up the vibe of this song. Roger Waters sure did. "The beginning of that bloody Phantom song is from 'Echoes,'" he told Q magazine. "It's the same time signature - it's 12/8 - and it's the same structure and it's the same notes and it's the same everything."

Rick Wright told Mojo magazine December 2008 that he wrote the music for this song. He explained: "The whole piano thing at the beginning and the chord structure is mine, so I had a large part in writing that. But it's credited to other people of course. Roger obviously wrote the lyrics."

RIP Rick Wright
#RIPRickWright
#PinkFloyd


Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1214
Simon and Garfunkel

  last edited: Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:03:16 -0400  
With a rhythmic salsa beat and distinctive horns, Late in The Evening become ...

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With a rhythmic salsa beat and distinctive horns, Late in The Evening become a fan favorite for Paul Simon (and Art Garfunkel). It describes a dream seq... - Mark Thomas - Google+


With a rhythmic salsa beat and distinctive horns, Late in The Evening become a fan favorite for Paul Simon (and Art Garfunkel). It describes a dream sequence that Paul Simon had when he was a teenager of being a rock star (he's "under age in this funky bar"). It's late at night (evening) and he's hearing the radio as he falls asleep and the next then he knows he's dreaming about walking down the street and then playing lead guitar in a band. Smoking a "J" obviously refers to a joint (marijuana) which when he was a teen in the 1960s would be typical for a rock band.

Simon wrote this song for One-Trick Pony, a semi-autobiographical movie he wrote and starred in. The song plays at the beginning and end of the film.

When Simon & Garfunkel played a free concert in New York's Central Park on September 19, 1981, the throngs of fans kept cheering, even after the encore. To appease them, the duo returned to the stage and reprised "Late in the Evening," which they had played earlier in the show.

#paulsimon
#simonandgarfunkel

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=11464
Pink Floyd Breathe

  
Look around, choose your own ground For long you live and high you fly And sm...

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Look around, choose your own ground For long you live and high you fly And smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry And all you touch and all you see Is ... - Mark Thomas - Google+


Look around, choose your own ground
For long you live and high you fly
And smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry
And all you touch and all you see
Is all your life will ever be

Run, rabbit run
Dig that hole, forget the sun
And when at last the work is done
Don't sit down, it's time to dig another one
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race towards an early grave

This song is about an older man speaking to a baby, telling it to breathe. The old man then describes the unfortunate working life the baby will have to face: "Run, rabbit, run. Dig that hole, forget the sun." The song implies that we need to overcome these messages and do what inspires us.

Many people believe Dark Side of the Moon acts as a soundtrack to The Wizard of Oz. When they are synched up, the line, "Balanced on the biggest wave" plays when Dorothy nearly loses her balance while walking along a fence.

This is followed on the album by an instrumental called "On The Run." The next song is "Time," which reprises "Breathe."

The whispers that can be heard throughout the album are references to Syd Barrett's madness - Dave Gilmour said this himself when interviewed about Dark Side of the Moon.

#pinkfloyd
Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=2703

Look around, choose your own ground
For long you live and high you fly
And smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry
And all you touch and all you see
Is all your life will ever be

Run, rabbit run
Dig that hole, forget the sun
And when at last the work is done
Don't sit down, it's time to dig another one
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race towards an early grave

This song is about an older man speaking to a baby, telling it to breathe. The old man then describes the unfortunate working life the baby will have to face: "Run, rabbit, run. Dig that hole, forget the sun." The song implies that we need to overcome these messages and do what inspires us.

Many people believe Dark Side of the Moon acts as a soundtrack to The Wizard of Oz. When they are synched up, the line, "Balanced on the biggest wave" plays when Dorothy nearly loses her balance while walking along a fence.

This is followed on the album by an instrumental called "On The Run." The next song is "Time," which reprises "Breathe."

The whispers that can be heard throughout the album are references to Syd Barrett's madness - Dave Gilmour said this himself when interviewed about Dark Side of the Moon.

#pinkfloyd
Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=2703
Jimi Hendrix Highway Chile

  
You'd probably call him a tramp But it goes a little deeper than that He's a ...

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You'd probably call him a tramp But it goes a little deeper than that He's a highway chile...  "Highway Chile" was described, in the book Jimi Hendrix: ... - Mark Thomas - Google+


You'd probably call him a tramp
But it goes a little deeper than that
He's a highway chile...

"Highway Chile" was described, in the book Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy, as "a joyful autobiographical stomp," explaining it as being a story of the pursuit of the American Dream. Matthew Greenwald of Allmusic also talks about the song as autobiographical, claiming that "It's easy to see that Hendrix was writing about himself here, and his life as a musician on the road in the R&B/soul "Chitlin' Circuit," and forming his own unique vision and style."

His guitar slung across his back
His dusty boots is his cadillac
Flamin' hair just a blowin' in the wind
Ain't seen a bed in so long it's a sin
He left home when he was seventeen
The rest of the world he had longed to see
But everybody knows the boss
A rolling stone who gathers no moss

Now some people say he had a girl back home
Who messed around and did him pretty wrong
They tell me it kinda hurt him bad
Kinda made him feel pretty sad
I couldn't say what went through his mind
Anyway, he left the world behind
But everybody knows the same old story,
In love and war you can't lose in glory

Now you'd probably call him a tramp
But I know it goes a little deeper than that
He's a highway chile

#hendrix
#jimihendrix

Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_Chile
If I was a carpenter- Tim Hardin, Bob Seger

  
If I Was A Carpenter was written by folk singer Tim Hardin, who performed it ...

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If I Was A Carpenter was written by folk singer Tim Hardin, who performed it at Woodstock in 1969. Hardin wrote "Reason To Believe" and some other songs... - Mark Thomas - Google+


If I Was A Carpenter was written by folk singer Tim Hardin, who performed it at Woodstock in 1969. Hardin wrote "Reason To Believe" and some other songs that became popular for other artists. He dealt with drug problems and died in 1980 at age 39. Here's Tim's Woodstock version https://youtu.be/F4OiAlgC310

The lyrics are written from the perspective of a man asking an elegant woman if she would still love and marry him if he was just a carpenter. There may be some biblical meaning, as Jesus was a carpenter.

Its given the big stadium treatment by Bob Seger here

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=4553

#bob
#bobseger
#timhardin
Led Zeppelin Dazed and Confused

  
Dazed and Confused is based on an acoustic song with the same title that Jimm...

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Dazed and Confused is based on an acoustic song with the same title that Jimmy Page heard folk singer Jake Holmes perform. ( Holmes version https://www.... - Mark Thomas - Google+


Dazed and Confused is based on an acoustic song with the same title that Jimmy Page heard folk singer Jake Holmes perform. ( Holmes version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1g7qFaWaLk)

When Page was a member of The Yardbirds, they played on the same bill with Holmes at the Village Theatre in New York City. Holmes' version is about an acid trip, but contains many of the same elements that made their way into the Led Zeppelin version: walking bass line, paranoid lyrics and an overall spooky sound. In the documentary Lost Rockers, Holmes said: "We were on the bill with The Yardbirds. We performed it there and blew the place apart with that song, and that's when Jimmy Page saw it. From what I gather from The Yardbirds, Page sent somebody out to get my album. He did a great job, but he certainly ripped me off."

The Yardbirds played the song in concert, but never recorded a studio version, although they did play it for a BBC taping in March 1968.

Led Zeppelin's version was not credited to Jake Holmes, as Page felt that he changed enough of the melody and added enough new lyrics to escape a plagiarism lawsuit. While Holmes took no action at the time, he did later contact Page regarding the matter. Holmes finally filed a lawsuit in 2010, alleging copyright infringement and naming the Led Zep guitarist as a co-defendant. It was the favorable judgment for organist Matthew Fisher in the "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" case that convinced Holmes to sue, as precedent was set that songwriting credits could be challenged in British courts many years after the fact. Holmes settled with Page and the case was dismissed on January 17, 2012. The songwriting credit was changed to the rather cryptic "Jimmy Page, Inspired By Jake Holmes."

In Shiloh Noone's book Seekers Guide To The Rhythm Of Yesteryear, he helps explain the origin of this song: "Jake Holmes, a one time member of Tim Rose & The Thorns, had written entire albums for Frank Sinatra and The Four Seasons, but his two most prolific albums released in 1967 are now recognized as groundbreaking projects. Jake's debut The Above Ground Sound Of Jake Holmes which featured Jake on acoustic guitar, Teddy Irwin on electric guitar and Rick Randle on bass carried the original 'Dazed And Confused' which Jimmy Page borrowed for the Led Zeppelin debut. This was confirmed when the Yardbirds witnessed Jake playing it live at The Village Gate in 1967. The same happened with the opening chords of Spirit's 'Taurus' which Jimmy used for 'Stairway To Heaven.' Jake's artistic actualization follow up, A Letter To Katherine December is translucently a monumental landscape that captures a surreal bluesy world somewhere between Arthur Lee and David McWilliams."
A version of Page performing this song with The Yardbirds can be found on the 1971 release Live Yardbirds. This version is listed as "I'm Confused" and has different lyrics than the Led Zeppelin version.

At live shows, Page played this using a violin bow on his guitar. He claimed that he got the idea from a session violinist he worked with who suggested it (the violinist was the father of actor David McCallum from The Man From U.N.C.L.E.). Eddie Phillips of the UK band The Creation guitarist pioneered the use of the violin bow on guitar strings, predating Page doing it in The Yardbirds by two years. You can hear it on the Creation song "Makin' Time." The secret to this technique: Put rosin on the bow, and the rosin sticks to the string and makes it vibrate.

This was a showcase song at most of Led Zeppelin's concerts. They sometimes improvised on it for up to 40 minutes.

The guitar solo following the bow section is Page's solo from the Yardbirds' "Think About It."

This was the first of three songs where Page used the bow. The others were "In The Light" and "How Many More Times." The first identifiable use of the cello bow on a Jimmy Page guitar was on a Yardbirds B-side called "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor." Speaking in the subject, Page said, "When I use violin bow on guitar, it's not just a gimmick as people think, It's because some great sounds come out. You can employ legitimate bowing techniques and gain new scope and depth."

One of the first songs Led Zeppelin recorded, "Dazed And Confused" was released as a single in the US in January 1969, two weeks before the album was issued.

Jake Holmes, who wrote the song on which this is based, never hit it big as a recording artist, but you've definitely heard his work: He wrote many famous jingles, including "Be a All That You Can Be" for the US Army and "Be A Pepper" for Dr. Pepper.

#jakeholmes
#ledzep
#ledzeppelin

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=300
Doors Rider On The Storm

  
Girl you gotta love your man Take him by the hand Make him understand The wor...

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Girl you gotta love your man Take him by the hand Make him understand The world on you depends  Riders On The Storm was the last song Jim Morrison recor... - Mark Thomas - Google+


Girl you gotta love your man
Take him by the hand
Make him understand
The world on you depends

Riders On The Storm was the last song Jim Morrison recorded. He went to France and died a few weeks later. The single was released in June 1971, shortly before Morrison's death.

The song can be seen as an autobiographical account of Morrison's life: he considered himself a "Rider on the storm." The "killer on the road" is a reference to a screenplay he wrote called The Hitchhiker (An American Pastoral), where Morrison was going to play the part of a hitchhiker who goes on a murder spree. The lyrics, "Girl you gotta love your man" can be seen as a desperate plea to his long time girlfriend Pamela.

As it says in Jim Morrison: Life, Death, Legend by Stephen Davis, in 1962, while Jim was attending Florida State University in Tallahassee, he was seeing a girl named Mary Werbelow who lived in Clearwater, 280 miles away. Jim would oftentimes hitchhike to see her. "Those solitary journeys on hot and dusty Florida two-lane blacktop roads, with his thumb out and his imagination on fire with lust and poetry and Nietzsche and God knows what else - taking chances on redneck truckers, fugitive homos, and predatory cruisers - left an indelible psychic scar on Jimmy, whose notebooks began to obsessively feature scrawls and drawings of a lone hitchhiker, an existential traveler, faceless and dangerous, a drifting stranger with violent fantasies, a mystery tramp: the killer on the road."

This evolved out of a jam session when the band was messing around with "Ghost Riders In the Sky," a 1948 cowboy song by Stan Jones that was later recorded by Johnny Cash, Bing Crosby and many others. It was Jim Morrison's idea to alter the title to "Riders On The Storm."

The Doors brought in bass players Marc Benno and Jerry Scheff to play on the album. Scheff came up with the distinctive bass line after Manzarek played him what he had in mind on his keyboard. It took a while to figure out, since it was much harder to play on a bass than a keyboard.

Ray Manzarek used a Fender Rhodes electric piano to create the effect of rain.
This was the last song on the last Doors album with Morrison. Fittingly, it ends with the storm fading slowly to silence. The remaining Doors released two more albums without Morrison before breaking up in 1972. In 2002, Kreiger and Manzarek reunited as "The Doors Of The 21st Century." Densmore, who says he wasn't invited to join them, went to court and eventually got a ruling preventing the group from using The Doors in its name, so they changed their name to "Riders On The Storm" after this song.

If you listen closely, you can hear Jim Morrison whispering the lyrics over his own singing, which causes a kind of creepy effect.

This was Morrison's final contribution as a rock star. Ray Manzarek told Uncut magazine September 2011: "There's a whisper voice on 'Riders on the Storm,' if you listen closely, a whispered overdub that Jim adds beneath his vocal. That's the last thing he ever did. An ephemeral, whispered overdub."

Paul Rothchild, who produced The Doors' first five albums, decided not to work on this because he didn't like the songs. He thought this sounded like "cocktail music." The Doors ended up producing it themselves with the help of their engineer, Bruce Botnick.

The single was shortened for radio play. Some of the piano solo was cut out.
In 2000, the surviving members of The Doors taped a VH1 Storytellers episode with guest vocalists filling in for Morrison. Scott Stapp from Creed sang on this track.

Creed contributed a version of this to the 2000 Doors tribute album Stoned Immaculate. Creed also performed it with Doors guitarist Robby Krieger at Woodstock '99. Krieger sat in on Creed's "What's This Life For" during the set.
Doors drummer John Densmore wrote a book called Riders On The Storm about his life with Jim Morrison and The Doors.

Eric Red, the screenwriter of the 1986 film The Hitcher, has said that his screenplay was inspired by this song. He said in an interview with DVD Active: "I thought the elements of the song - a killer on the road in a storm plus the cinematic feel of the music - would make an terrific opening for a film. I started with that scene and went from there."

When the 71-year-old Ray Manzarak was asked by the Somerville Journal in March 2010 if he turns up or turns off Doors music when he hears it on the radio. Manzarek said, "Oh, God, turn it up! Are you kidding? Living up in northern California, it rains a lot, so they play the heck out of 'Riders on the Storm.' And when that comes on, I crank that sucker, man."

When he recorded this song, Jim Morrison had already decided that he was going to leave the band and go to Paris, where he would die. Some of the lyrics in this song ("girl, you gotta love your man...") relate to his love for his girlfriend Pam Courson, who went with him to France.

At the end of this song, there are sound effects of thunder, and the faint voice of Jim Morrison whispering, "riders on the storm." This was envisioned as his spirit whispering from the beyond.

#doors
#thedoors

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?lyrics=273
Van Morrison And It Stoned Me

  
Favorite Van. Lovely warmth to this track.  "And It Stoned Me" was recorded i...

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Favorite Van. Lovely warmth to this track.  "And It Stoned Me" was recorded in summer 1969 at Warner Publishing Studio in New York City.  As Morrison bi... - Mark Thomas - Google+


Favorite Van. Lovely warmth to this track.

"And It Stoned Me" was recorded in summer 1969 at Warner Publishing Studio in New York City.

As Morrison biographer Ritchie Yorke described it, the song remembered "how it was when you were a kid and just got stoned from nature and you didn't need anything else". Morrison, in 1985, related the song to a quasi-mystical experience he had as a child:

I suppose I was about twelve years old. We used to go to a place called Ballystockart to fish. We stopped in the village on the way up to this place and I went to this little stone house, and there was an old man there with dark weather-beaten skin, and we asked him if he had any water. He gave us some water which he said he'd got from the stream. We drank some and everything seemed to stop for me. Time stood still. For five minutes everything was really quiet and I was in this 'other dimension'. That's what the song is about.

During this song Morrison sings: "...Stoned me just like Jelly Roll. And it stoned me." That lyric is thought to be a reference to jazz musician Jelly Roll Morton, whose recordings Morrison listened to with his father as he was growing up.

#vanmorrison
#vantheman

Source Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_It_Stoned_Me
Chris Isaak A bad bad thing

  
A bad bad thing

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A bad bad thing - Mark Thomas - Google+
Bob Dylan Knocking On Heavens Door

  
That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.  This ver...

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That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.  This version is Dylan with the late Tom Petty. Here's the original out of the Billy... - Mark Thomas - Google+


That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.

This version is Dylan with the late Tom Petty. Here's the original out of the Billy the Kid movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjR7_U2u3sM

Knocking on Heavens' Door is written from the perspective of a dying sheriff:

Dylan wrote it for the 1973 Western film, Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid. It plays while Sheriff Colin Baker is dying from his gunshot wounds. Dylan cameos in the movie as the character, Alias.
Booker T. Jones sometimes tells a story of playing bass on this track (he and Dylan were neighbors in Malibu), but Terry Paul is credited as the bass player. Jones is credited on four other songs from the soundtrack.

The other personnel on the original "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" are:

Vocals, Guitar: Dylan
Guitar: Roger McGuinn
Drums: Jim Keltner
Harmonium: Carl Fortina
Flute: Gary Foster
Backup Vocals: Brenda Patterson, Carol Hunter, Donna Weiss


Guns N' Roses covered this on their 1991 album, Use Your Illusion II. They played it in 1992 at a tribute concert for Freddie Mercury, the lead singer of Queen, who had died of AIDS. 72,000 people attended the concert, which was held in London's Wembley Stadium. In case you're wondering, towards the end of the end of this version, the man on the telephone says, "You just better start sniffin your own rank subjugation Jack, 'cause it's just you and your tattered libido, the bank and the mortician, forever man and it wouldn't be luck if you could get out of life alive."

In 1996, Bob Dylan allowed the Scottish musician Ted Christopher to record a new verse for "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" which Christopher had written in memory of the schoolchildren and teacher killed in the Dunblane massacre. This is one of the rare times Dylan has officially permitted someone to add to or change the lyrics to one of his songs. Christopher's version reached #1 in the UK.

One of the few times Dylan authorized a sample was when he let the British singer Gabrielle use this song as the basis of her 1999 track "Rise," which went to #1 in the UK. According to Gabrielle, Dylan not only allowed it, but waived some of the royalties he was entitled to.

#bobdylan

Source http://songfacts.com
Thin Lizzy Out In The Fields

  
It doesn't matter If you're wrong or if you're right It makes no difference I...

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It doesn't matter If you're wrong or if you're right It makes no difference If you're black or if you're white  All men are equal Till the victory is wo... - Mark Thomas - Google+


It doesn't matter
If you're wrong or if you're right
It makes no difference
If you're black or if you're white

All men are equal
Till the victory is won
No colour or religion
Ever stopped the bullet from a gun

Out in the fields
The fighting has begun
Out on the streets
They're falling one by one
Out from the skies
A thousand more will die each day
Death is just a heartbeat away

It doesn't matter
If you're left or to the right
Don't try to hide behind the cause
They want to fight

There'll be no prisoners taken
When the day is done
No flag, no uniform
Ever stopped the bullet from a gun

Out in the fields
The fighting has begun
Out on the streets
They're falling one by one
Out from the skies
A thousand more will die each day
Death is just a heartbeat away

There's no communication
No one to take the blame
The cries of every nation
They're falling on deaf ears again

Out in the fields
Out in the fields
They're falling one by one
Out in the fields
No flag has ever stopped
The bullet from a gun

Death is just a heartbeat away
Out in the fields
A heartbeat away
Out in the fields
Death is just a heartbeat away
Out in the fields
A heartbeat away
Out in the fields

In the fields
The fighting has begun
Out on the streets
They're falling one by one
Out from the skies
A thousand more will die each day

OUT!

#thinlizzy
#garymoore
#phillynott
Amy Winehouse

  
Amy Winehouse_Back to Black https://youtu.be/TJAfLE39ZZ8👈  Su segundo álbum ...

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Amy Jade Winehouse was born in Southgate, north London to a Jewish family. Her father Mitch was a double-glazing salesman who later became a taxi driver and her mother Janis, is a pharmacist. They separated when Amy was nine.

Amy grew up listening to her father's Jazz albums, and her grandmother was once engaged to the English Jazz tenor saxophonist and jazz club owner, Ronnie Scott. She also came under the influence from an early age of her uncles who were professional Jazz players.

At the age of ten, Amy founded a short-lived rap group called Sweet 'n' Sour with childhood friend Juliette Ashby.

Amy caught the performing bug early, and by the age of eight she was attending the Susi Earnshaw Theatre School. She later was a pupil at the Sylvia Young theatre school in central London, from which she was asked to leave because she was disrupting lessons and "not applying herself." Amy then had a short spell at the Brit School in Croydon, south London.
Amy made her first television appearance in 1997 when with other children from the Sylvia Young School, she appeared in an episode of the BBC comedy sketch series The Fast Show.
Amy's rebellious instincts began to surface in her mid-teens. By the age of 16, she had acquired her first tattoo and was smoking cannabis.

She received her first guitar when she was 13, and began writing music a year later. Winehouse's significant break came at 16, when a former boyfriend, soul hopeful Tyler James, sent a tape of her singing with a Jazz band to his A&R manager. It led to a contract with the Island/Universal record label and a publishing deal with EMI.

Winehouse's greatest musical love was 1960s girl groups. Her stylist Alex Foden borrowed her beehive hairdo and her Cleopatra makeup from groups like The Ronettes.

Winehouse's debut album, the jazz-infused Frank, was released on October 20, 2003. It received generally positive reviews from most music critics and earned Winehouse several accolades, including an Ivor Novello Award for the first single "Stronger Than Me."
Winehouse's second album Back To Black, was released on October 4, 2006. Most of the songs were inspired by her relationship and break up with her then boyfriend Blake Fielder-Civil. They later got together again and got married at a secret ceremony in Miami in May 2007. The relationship ended when Fielder-Civil received a jail sentence of 27 months the following July.
Back To Black earned Winehouse a succession of awards, most notably five Grammies including three of the "Big Four": Best New Artist, Record of the Year and Song of the Year. It was the biggest-selling album of 2007 worldwide, with over 5.5 million copies sold that year, topping the charts in 18 countries. In the United Kingdom it was the third biggest seller of the 2000s.

Winehouse battled drug and alcohol abuse, violence, and self-destructive behaviours throughout her career. After the success of Back To Black her problems with substance abuse became regular tabloid news until her death. Typically forthright, she drew attention to her alcohol problems in Back to Black's first single, "Rehab," which became her signature song.
Winehouse's last public appearance took place at Camden's Roundhouse, London on July 20, 2011, when she made a surprise guest appearance on stage to support her goddaughter, Dionne Bromfield. Video footage shows Amy shimming and coaxing cheers from the audience, as her goddaughter sings "Mama Said."

Winehouse was found dead on July 23, 2011, at her home in London. She was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium. In October, the coroner reported that her death was caused by alcohol poisoning, with her blood-alcohol level 5 times over the legal driving limit at the time of her death.

In a 2017 Billboard interview, Bob Dylan was asked if he was a fan of Amy Winehouse. "Yeah, absolutely," he answered. "She was the last real individualist around."

#amy
#amywinehouse

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=24784
Originally shared by Paty Montes – 16 comments
Amy Winehouse_Back to Black
https://youtu.be/TJAfLE39ZZ8👈

Su segundo álbum de estudio, Back to Black, fue publicado en 2006. Por este disco la cantante consiguió seis nominaciones a los Premios Grammy, de las cuales ganó cinco; entre ellas, Canción del año, Grabación del año y Mejor artista nuevo.
  last edited: Thu, 18 Oct 2018 21:16:45 -0400  
Pinball Wizard was the last song written for the album Tommy. Townshend wrote...

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Pinball Wizard was the last song written for the album Tommy. Townshend wrote it when he found out influential UK rock critic Nik Cohn was coming to review the project. Townshend knew Cohn was a pinball fanatic, so he put this together to ensure a good review. Cohn gave it a great review, and pinball became a main theme of the rock opera.
The character Tommy played pinball by feeling the vibrations of the machine. Townshend liked how that related to listeners picking up the vibrations of the music to feel the story.
The single version was sped up to make it more radio-friendly.
This was the most famous and enduring song from the Tommy project. Along with “See Me, Feel Me,” it is one of 2 songs from the album that The Who played throughout their career.
The Who performed this at Woodstock in 1969. The song was still fairly new, so many in the crowd did not recognize it. The Who were given the early morning slot, so they ended up playing this as the sun came up.
The Who performed the entire album from start to finish on their subsequent tour. Two of the dates were in the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.
The famous guitar riff was sampled by The Shocking Blue on their 1969 hit “Venus,” which was covered by Bananarama in 1986.

The album got The Who out of a financial mess. After a legal battle with their manager, Shel Talmy, and some bad business deals in England, they were facing bankruptcy if it didn’t sell.
After writing this song for Nik Cohn, Townshend almost didn’t even mention it to the band because he hated it so much. They told him to play it and told him he had written a hit. Meanwhile, he thought it was a mindless, badly written song. >>
According to the book The Duh Awards by Bob Fenster, Rod Stewart asked Elton John if he should accept an offer to sing in Tommy. Elton told him no way, “Don’t touch it with a barge pole.” A year later, The Who asked Elton John to sing the same song. Elton grabbed his barge pole and took the offer. “I don’t think Rod’s quite forgiven me for that,” he commented years later. >>
The Dutch group The Shocking Blue used the guitar riff from this song for their 1969 hit "Venus."
Townshend played a 1968 Gibson SG Special guitar on this song.

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1527

#thewho
#who
  
Fish in the sea you know how I feel River running free you know how I feel Bl...

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Fish in the sea you know how I feel River running free you know how I feel Blossom on the tree you know how I feel  It's a new dawn It's a new day It's ... - Mark Thomas - Google+