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Classic Rock

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Bob Dylan Knocking On Heavens Door

  
That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.  This ver...

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That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.  This version is Dylan with the late Tom Petty. Here's the original out of the Billy... - Mark Thomas - Google+


That long black cloud is coming down. It's getting too dark to see.

This version is Dylan with the late Tom Petty. Here's the original out of the Billy the Kid movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjR7_U2u3sM

Knocking on Heavens' Door is written from the perspective of a dying sheriff:

Dylan wrote it for the 1973 Western film, Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid. It plays while Sheriff Colin Baker is dying from his gunshot wounds. Dylan cameos in the movie as the character, Alias.
Booker T. Jones sometimes tells a story of playing bass on this track (he and Dylan were neighbors in Malibu), but Terry Paul is credited as the bass player. Jones is credited on four other songs from the soundtrack.

The other personnel on the original "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" are:

Vocals, Guitar: Dylan
Guitar: Roger McGuinn
Drums: Jim Keltner
Harmonium: Carl Fortina
Flute: Gary Foster
Backup Vocals: Brenda Patterson, Carol Hunter, Donna Weiss


Guns N' Roses covered this on their 1991 album, Use Your Illusion II. They played it in 1992 at a tribute concert for Freddie Mercury, the lead singer of Queen, who had died of AIDS. 72,000 people attended the concert, which was held in London's Wembley Stadium. In case you're wondering, towards the end of the end of this version, the man on the telephone says, "You just better start sniffin your own rank subjugation Jack, 'cause it's just you and your tattered libido, the bank and the mortician, forever man and it wouldn't be luck if you could get out of life alive."

In 1996, Bob Dylan allowed the Scottish musician Ted Christopher to record a new verse for "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" which Christopher had written in memory of the schoolchildren and teacher killed in the Dunblane massacre. This is one of the rare times Dylan has officially permitted someone to add to or change the lyrics to one of his songs. Christopher's version reached #1 in the UK.

One of the few times Dylan authorized a sample was when he let the British singer Gabrielle use this song as the basis of her 1999 track "Rise," which went to #1 in the UK. According to Gabrielle, Dylan not only allowed it, but waived some of the royalties he was entitled to.

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Source http://songfacts.com